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Copyright © 2019 eIDForum OÜ (registry code 14438390)

eID Forum 2018 is co-funded by the EU structural funds support scheme "Raising Public Awareness about the Information Society" (European Regional Development Fund).

Our Speaker
Adam Cooper
Chief Architect
ID2020
United Kingdom
eID Forum Partners

Meet our Speaker: Adam Cooper

Adam Cooper is an identity standards expert, policy lead, and enterprise architect with over 25 years of experience in IT and digital disciplines.

 

Adam is currently Chief Architect for ID2020 and a technical consultant to the World Bank ID4D programme, as well as acting in an advisory capacity for other international projects such as the EU funded LIGHTest project and the Scottish Online Identity Assurance Programme.

 

Previously responsible for the overall technical architecture of the UK eID service, GOV.UK Verify, policy and technical leadership for the UK government with the eIDAS Regulation regarding cross-border eID in the European Union, and an expert contributor to multiple international standards bodies such as the BSI, ISO, OpenID Foundation, and W3C, Adam has a wide range of experience to draw upon.

eTalk: Improving lives through digital identity

By Adam Cooper, Chief Architect, ID2020, United Kingdom

Over 1 billion people worldwide are unable to prove their identity through any recognized means. As such, they are without the protection of law, and are unable to access basic services, participate as a citizen or voter, or transact in the modern economy. Most of those affected are children and adolescents, and many are refugees, forcibly displaced, or stateless persons. 

 

Trusted digital identity is conventionally the result of an identity provision or registration process backed by governments or corporations based on rules that satisfy the identity needs of the services that interact with that scheme. This is often out of reach for marginalised or excluded communities.

 

For many individuals who either do not have a legal identity, or have a need to protect their human rights, this is an impossible barrier. This talk will highlight other models for the use of digital identity recognising that people are best placed to decide how they are identified digitally not governments or corporations. Models that promote inclusion through the ability for everyone to obtain a digital identity based on the proof they have, trust and wish to disclose.

  • Many of the most vulnerable people in the world are without the means of proving their identity and the protection this can afford.

 

  • For some, including refugees, the stateless, and other marginalized groups, reliance on national identification systems isn't possible.

 

  • New approaches to digital identity where multiple methods of trust are available to individuals when proving their identity are essential, including the portability of identity and trust between schemes as well as across borders.

 
 
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